Jennifer L. Goff


Postdoctoral Research Associate


Curriculum vitae


JLGoff@uga.edu


Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology


University of Georgia



Tellurite Adsorption onto Bacterial Surfaces.


Journal article


Jennifer L Goff, Yuwei Wang, M. Boyanov, Qiang Yu, K. Kemner, J. Fein, N. Yee
Environmental science & technology, 2021

Semantic Scholar DOI PubMed
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APA
Goff, J. L., Wang, Y., Boyanov, M., Yu, Q., Kemner, K., Fein, J., & Yee, N. (2021). Tellurite Adsorption onto Bacterial Surfaces. Environmental Science & Technology.

Chicago/Turabian
Goff, Jennifer L, Yuwei Wang, M. Boyanov, Qiang Yu, K. Kemner, J. Fein, and N. Yee. “Tellurite Adsorption onto Bacterial Surfaces.” Environmental science & technology (2021).

MLA
Goff, Jennifer L., et al. “Tellurite Adsorption onto Bacterial Surfaces.” Environmental Science & Technology, 2021.


Abstract

Tellurium (Te) is an emerging contaminant and its chemical transformation in the environment is strongly influenced by microbial processes. In this study, we investigated the adsorption of tellurite [Te(IV), TeO32-] onto the common soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis. Thiol-blocking experiments were carried out to investigate the role of cell surface sulfhydryl sites in tellurite binding, and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy was performed to determine the chemical speciation of the adsorbed tellurite. The results indicate that tellurite reacts with sulfhydryl functional groups in the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) produced by B. subtilis. Upon binding to sulfhydryl sites in the EPS, the Te changes from Te-O bonds to Te-S coordination. Further analysis of the surface-associated molecules shows that the EPS of B. subtilis contain proteins. Removal of the proteinaceous EPS dramatically decreases tellurite adsorption and the sulfhydryl surface site concentration. These findings indicate that sulfhydryl binding in EPS plays a key role in tellurite adsorption on bacterial surfaces.


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